IPMC 2010
Historiography: Writing about Music in Canada
June 2, Regina
Submission Deadline: April 30, 2010
After a successful and invigorating first meeting of the Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Music in Canada working group in August 2009 at the University of Toronto, we are pleased to announce a second meeting on June 2 in Regina in conjunction with CUMS, IASPM Canada, and the CSTM. We welcome new members to this working group from all of the associations that will meet in Regina, as well as from scholars whose work addresses music in Canada from interdisciplinary perspectives.
Our meeting in Regina will focus on the Historiography of Music in Canada. As part of this meeting we will again welcome participants working in all genres of music and sound practices in Canada. This meeting will provide an opportunity for us to re-examine how ‘Canadian Music’ and Music in Canada have been alternately mythologized and narrated, as well as the ways in which we might further develop our writing on such musical practices. For this meeting we will adopt a format that allows for a 2-hour discussion of reading(s) on Historiography (TBA) that we will apply to the study of music in Canada. We welcome participants’ suggestions for reading(s). The morning session will be followed by two plenaries, each including two 30-minute presentations. Each presentation will be followed by a 10-minute respondent, and a 30-minute discussion of the presentation.
Please send your proposals for plenary papers, expressions of interest for acting as a respondent, and general expressions of interest in participating in this working group to both Mary Ingraham (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Dylan Robinson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) by April 30, 2010.
The following provides a list of questions of potential interest to participants of this upcoming working group meeting in Regina. Many of these questions have been drawn from our initial discussions on Historiography and Epistemology during the 2009 meeting in Toronto. We are interested both to build upon these ideas, and to explore a wider range of perspectives not included in the list below.
Canadian music history has traditionally been written in relation to the unifying thematic narratives of the Canadian landscape, as well as through concepts of diversity and
multiculturalism. To what degree are these unifying narratives still of use? Does their unity ultimately misrepresent musical practices across Canada? Do such narratives act as nation-building structures in themselves, and if so, how might we interrogate the nation-building processes such historicization represents?
How do we bring other voices into the types of stories we tell about Canadian music? What modes of writing offer space for such voices to participate without subjugating them?
To what extent does our writing intervene in the way knowledge is constructed in the multiple fields and publics in which it participates? How might we further explore models of ‘applied musicology’ or entertain more activist modes of engagement between the writing we do and those audience members and musicians who are present in the music practices we write about and the readers to whom we are directing our writing?
What more synchronous modes of discourse between writing voice and subject matter might be of use in writing the histories of Canadian music?
Who are the agents of history and should we care about how they relate to music. What images might we define that allow us to rethink the relationships of past, present, and future? What new shapes of history might better reflect the musical communities and practices in Canada that we study?
How in general might we take greater risks in our writing? How might we better engage our audience through a more creative association with the particular musics we write about?
There has been a striking reluctance to be critical of musical practices in Canada, as scholars on Canadian music have felt the need first to advocate for the value of the music under examination. It has been noted that “musicologists, more often perhaps than social scientists or even literary critics, have sometimes played the role of publicity officer for specific composers, musical traditions, or regions.” (Diamond) How might we expand our writing toward productive critique of Canadian musical practices?
How might we explore the further reaches of the ways in which the musics of Canada affect us in both affirmative and critical aspects? Should we, as suggested by Ellie Hisama, cultivate a “musicology of the repulsive,” that is, a musicology that expresses our concerns regarding “music that we don’t care for [and] of music that we find dull, inept, or downright repulsive, [or] of music that we understand to negate, devalue, and disrespect who we are … ”. How might we develop alternative modes for discussing our attraction to particular works and practices as advocated by Suzanne Cusick and Marion Guck? (to name only two). How might we approach these while avoiding the pitfalls of becoming arbitrators of musical taste?
How, in our writing, do we situate ourselves when telling of the embodied listening practices we engage in as members (or observers) of musical communities in Canada?

Submission Deadline: April 30, 2010 

After a successful and invigorating first meeting of the Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Music in Canada working group in August 2009 at the University of Toronto, we are pleased to announce a second meeting on June 2 in Regina in conjunction with CUMS, IASPM Canada, and the CSTM. We welcome new members to this working group from all of the associations that will meet in Regina, as well as from scholars whose work addresses music in Canada from interdisciplinary perspectives. 

Tenure-Track Positions in the Schulich School of Music of McGill University

The Schulich School of Music is Canada’s largest and leading University based program for the training of professional composers and performers, and for humanities-based and scientific-technological research in music and sound. McGill’s Schulich School is also home to CIRMMT, the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music Media and Technology, a global leader for innovation in music cognition, creative media, broadband transmission, and scientific-engineering applications for music. We seek individuals with an international profile in musical creation, performance or research, who will maintain a high-level of professional activity in the field and are able to teach and supervise students in all university degree and diploma programs through to the doctoral level.

Department of Music Research—Theory Area

  • Review of applications begins immediately. Those received by Mar. 30, 2010 will be given full consideration
  • Interviews to be scheduled early Spring 2010.
  • Appointment starts August 2010 (initial 3-year tenure-track appointment)

Applications are invited for a tenure-track appointment in Music Theory at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor. We are open to all areas of research specialization. The successful applicant will have superior musicianship and be comfortable teaching the full range of core undergraduate classes, as well as undergraduate and graduate offerings in his or her own area of specialization.

Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests, and arrange to have three letters of reference sent by hard copy to the School’s mailing address (see below), to the attention of:

Professor Lloyd Whitesell – Chair, Department of Music Research
Tel: 514.398.4540/Fax: 514.398.1540 / Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Department of Performance—Organ & Church Music Area
  • Review/Consideration of applications begins June 1, 2010
  • Interviews to be scheduled early in Autumn 2010.
  • Appointment starts August 2011 (initial 3-year tenure-track appointment)

Applications are invited for a tenure-track appointment in Organ and Church Music as the University Organist at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor. We are seeking a candidate with significant international performance profile, extensive teaching experience at the university level and exceptional organizational skills. The candidate should be knowledgeable about historical performance practice and have a keen interest in contemporary music. Duties will include teaching undergraduate and graduate organ majors, coordination of the Organ and Church Music Area as well as supervision of the maintenance of the organs on campus.

Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae along with a statement of professional and teaching interests, and arrange to have three letters of reference sent by hard copy to the School’s mailing address (see below), to the attention of:

Professor André J. Roy – Chair, Department of Performance
Tel : 514.398.4542/Fax : 514.398.1540 / Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Salaries for both positions are negotiable, according to qualifications and experience. Positions are subject to final budgetary approval.

All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, priority will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada.

McGill University is committed to equity in employment and diversity. It welcomes applications from indigenous peoples, visible minorities, ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, women, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities and other who may contribute to further diversification

CHORAL DIRECTOR, ORCHESTRE SYMPHONIQUE DE MONTREAL (OSM) / ASSISTANT OR ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SCHUICH SCHOOL OF MUSIC OF MCGILL UNIVERSITY

Reporting to the Musical Director and to the Director of Artistic Operations and Executive Producer, primary responsibilities of the OSM Choral Director will include recruitment and auditioning of professional and amateur members; musical preparation for all programs and recordings that involve chorus; planning and scheduling of rehearsals. Working closely with the Musical Director and/or guest conductors on questions of repertoire, style and interpretation, the Choral Director is expected to conduct all chorus rehearsals; attend all rehearsals, concerts and recording sessions led by the Musical Director or guest conductors; conduct concerts at the Musical Director’s request. Position beginning with the 2011-2012 season.

In conjunction with duties as OSM Choral Director, the successful candidate will be invited to take up a negotiated part-time position (approximately 50% load) at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor in the Department of Performance of the Schulich School of Music of McGill University for an initial term of three years (non tenure track) beginning August 1, 2011. Depending upon qualifications and interests, responsibilities will include the direction of one or more choral ensembles, graduate supervision, etc. The Schulich School of Music is the largest and most renowned university-based professional training program in Canada, and an international leader in humanities-based and scientific-technologies research in music and sound.

Highly qualified candidates (doctoral degree or equivalent professional experience) are invited to send their curriculum vitae by March 31, 2010 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by mail (postmarked March 31, 2010) to the following address:

Marie-Claude Briand
Production Coordinator, Artistic Operations
OSM
260 Maisonneuve Blvd. West, 2nd floor
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1Y9

Auditions for the Choral Director will take place Saturday, May 8, 2010 in Montreal and only selected candidates will receive an invitation by April 8, 2010.

Salary will be negotiable according to qualifications and experience. All qualified applicants are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

McGill University is committed to equity in employment and diversity. It welcomes applications from indigenous peoples, visible minorities, ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, women, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities and others who may contribute to further diversification.

A Festival of New Music by B.C. Composers - presented by Vancouver Pro Musica
April 8-11, 2010
The Western Front (303 East 8th Avenue, Vancouver B.C.)

SONIC BOOM is an annual festival of new music featuring original works by British Columbia composers. It is a festival widely regarded as one of Canada's most important showcases for new work, including pieces by both established and emerging composers, all performed by top-quality ensembles, groups, and soloists. Since 1984 when the festival began, it has been a focal point in the burgeoning Vancouver new music scene showcasing the work of composers from all across the province. This year’s lineup consists of works written by composers representing Vancouver, Victoria, Burnaby, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, New Westminster, Langley, Maple Ridge, Kamloops, Penticton, and Saanichton.

Known for its musical diversity, the only stylistic limitation of the pieces you will hear at the SONIC BOOM festival is the degree to which the composers for that year desire to push the boundaries of the new music genre. This year there is a 15 piece string ensemble; a 6 piece chamber ensemble; an Erhu and Ruan duet; a variety of electro-acoustic performers; a clarinet and percussion duet; a zheng and vocal duet; a variety of vocal solos; a piano, violin, and cello trio; a piano and voice duet; a flute solo; a clarinet, piano, violin and cello quartet; a viola and guitar duo; a variety of piano solos; and a string quartet.

SONIC BOOM 2010 showcases new original works from 38 BC composers over the four evenings of the event featuring the talents of string ensemble Orchestra Armonia (conducted by John van Deursen) as Ensemble in Residence and Janet Danielson (Music Instructor at Simon Fraser University) as Composer in Residence. Nu:BC is the featured ensemble.

Thursday April 8th, 2010

7:30 pm - Variety of small groups and soloists performing 9 new compositions by BC composers.

Friday April 9th, 2010

7:30 pm - Nu: BC chamber ensemble performing 10 new compositions by BC composers.

Saturday April 10th, 2010

4:00 pm – Dr. Bob Pritchard plenary lecture on electro-acoustic music.

7:30 pm - Orchestra Armonia string ensemble performing 10 new compositions by BC Composers including Janet Danielson’s Suite Vancouver (commissioned by Vancouver Pro Musica with support from British Columbia Arts Council).

Sunday April 11th, 2010

Sunday morning (9 am or 10 am to 12 noon) - student composers' master class conducted by Janet Danielson with Rachel Iwaasa on piano and Paolo Bortolussi on flute as the reading ensemble.

7:30 pm – A variety of small groups and soloists performing 9 new compositions by BC composers.

SONIC BOOM 2010

April 8-11, 2010

Each night from 7:30 pm to 10:00 pm – reception afterwards

The Western Front (303 East 8th Avenue, Vancouver B.C.)

Doors open at 7:00 pm

Each night: Tickets are $20 General / $15 Students, Seniors, Artists

or $35 for a Festival Pass for all four evenings of concerts.

Tickets available at the door (cash only please).

www.vancouverpromusica.ca
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Media contact: Ellie O’Day, O’Day Productions
604.731.3339, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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