Vol. 33, No. 1
Publication Date: 2014-06-12
Number of articles: 9

Editorial

À la recherche de la recherche-création : la création d’une interdiscipline universitaire 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Sophie Stévance

Articles

Centring The Periphery: Local Identity in the Music of Theodore Antoniou and other Twentieth-Century Greek Composers 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Michalis Andronikou

Abstract

This study addresses aspects of local identity in the music of Theodore Antoniou and other Greek contemporary composers. It highlights misapprehensions and obsolete conceptions of historiography and aesthetics embedded in the use of terms such as centre and periphery or high- and low-brow styles of music, respectively. An overview of the history of art music in Greece is attempted, for a better understanding of these issues in that context. The parallel reference to significant Western contemporary composers such as György Ligeti, Luigi Nono, and Mauricio Kagel supports the primary argument of the essay, which seeks fair treatment for all places that find themselves peripheral to a given centre. The case of Greece—one of the cradles of Western culture—is a unique example of a problematic approach typical of Western historiographies with regard “centres” and “peripheries” that needs to be corrected.

Où (en) est (l’étude de) la musique (au cinéma ?) du film ? 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Serge Cardinal

Abstract

Where is the film music? This question is expected to help map the territory of our film music experience. This study’s starting point is a sequence from Leos Carax’s film Mauvais sang (1986). In this sequence, music is the main purpose of the dialogue: it uses the radio broadcast of two songs to configure the filmic space, and the characters’ bodies are lead by their rhythm. In doing so, the whole sequence is subjected to the phenomenology and expressive logic of music: transparency and reflection, colours and shapes, human body choreography and visual rhythm, etc., every component of the sequence is shaped by the music. In consequence, the staging creates a space for the viewer, the film theorist and the musicologist, where the film materials can truly meet. It is a space where it is possible to experience altogether a musical work, a musical reality and the musicality of film. This space is also instrumental when answers are sought to the question: where is film music?

Articles

Michel Chion, théoricien, musicien et cinéaste 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par

Articles

Son organisé, partition sonore, ordre musical : la pensée et la pratique cinématographiques d’Edgard Varèse et de Michel Fano 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Frédéric Dallaire

Abstract

This essay traces the development of a musical sensibility in cinema through the writings and works of Edgard Varèse and Michel Fano. Varèse laid the foundation of a new paradigm in describing the transformations music undergoes in contact with images, and in embedding sound in the cinematographic process of recording/editing/diffusion. For Varèse, the notions of organized sound and sound score are tools allowing conceiving and working with filmic musicality. Then, in the 1960s, Fano, inspired by some of Varèse’s ideas, experienced them by composing several sound scores, among which are some for movies by Alain Robbe-Grillet. In integrating all the film sounds (speech, noise, music) in a musical work, the composer produces a new way of listening, and a specific awareness of music in cinema. The sounds (and images) are divided into formants, and the composer connects them in order to create musical affects and signifiers. Notions of sound continuum, musical order, and formant enrich and add to the dynamic of the work of composition as conceived by Varèse. Ultimately, consideration of organized sound in cinema is based on the process of mutual construction of the sound sphere, the film compositional thought and aesthetic forms. The composer works on a continuous plane, which is the sound score, where materials and interactions are to be shaped and organized. The composer links sounds and builds a complex audiovisual network of formants. This continuous sound space, composed of tensions, consonances, dissonances, and energetic and semantic confrontations, modifies deeply our conception of music in film.

De l’orchestre À la machine 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par François Gauthier

Abstract

Paul Baillargeon, a Canadian, composed the music for more than forty Star Trek television episodes, which are now translated and known around the world. Star Trek is one of the last American television series to have its music played by an important symphonic orchestra, before composers understood that they could use instead computers and digital samples, replacing by doing so the fifty musicians who were perpetuating the acoustic musical Hollywood tradition. This essay examines how those digital tools had impacted on composers’ music, and on his work within the postproduction stages of popular television series.

Book Reviews

James Buhler, David Neumeyer, and Rob Deemer. 2010. Hearing the Movies: Music and Sound in Film History. New York: Oxford University Press. 470 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-532779-3 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Mark Richards

Patrik N. Juslin et John A. Sloboda (éd). 2010 (c2001). Handbook of Music and Emotion : Theory, Research, Applications. Oxford : Oxford University Press. 976 p. ISBN 978-0-19-960496-8, couverture souple 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Milada Medinić-Kazazić

Murray Dineen. 2011. Friendly Remainders: Essays in Musical Criticism after Adorno. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. xi, 248 pp. ISBN 978-0-7735-3884-9 (hardcover), ISBN 978-0-7735-3919-8 (paperback) 

PDF through Erudit | Member Access

By / par Sherry Lee

MusCan Office

MusCan is led by a committed community of volunteers from across Canada. You can contact our secretariat by mail, phone, or email.

10 Morrow Avenue, Suite 202
Toronto, ON
M6R 2J1
Canada
416-538-1650
office [AT] muscan.org